Adventures with 64-bit

I had a pair of 500Gb Seagate drives.  They served me well for a couple of years, but they’ve been getting steadily closer to the dreaded 100% full mark over the last six months.
To celebrate the release of Ubuntu 9.10, I treated myself to a pair of shiny new Seagate ST31500341AS drives. Popped them in to my machine, fired up the 64-bit Ubuntu installer and… wow – my machine is much much faster.
Now I need to get to grips with all the little gotchas of running a 64-bit desktop, such as Google Gears and Flash requiring some fun and games to work properly.

Ubuntu 9.10

I took the plunge and upgraded from Ubuntu 9.04 to Ubuntu 9.10 on my work laptop. The process was incredibly smooth, and there’s not much to it apart from that.  I’m crossing my fingers and hoping the dbus problems with 3G dongle PPP connections have gone away.
I am waiting for some free time at the weekend and a pair of 1Tb hard drives before I take the plunge and install the 64-bit version on my desktop at home.

Cisco IOS 15.0(1)M

I am never one to fear something new – except perhaps a new release of a JVM.
Some weeks ago, I decided it would be a good idea to upgrade one of my home routers to IOS 15.0(1)M – seeing as I paid enough for a maintenance contract, I’m entitled.  Ever since that day, I’ve been unable to ssh to the router with an access-class applied to the VTY lines.  Every time, it refuses my connection, but allows it without an access-class.
This morning, I stumbled upon the answer – put ‘vrf-also’ at the end of the access-class line: access-class 99 in vrf-also. This only matters if you’re running VRF Lite, as I am, because I have a separate firewall and ‘clean’ and ‘dirty’ VRFs.
Never fear something that’s new – expect breakage, and expect to learn.